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Tarzan (1999) Disney [DVD]

Tarzan (1999) Disney [DVD]
£19.99

Walt Disney Classic No. 37 FIRST EDITION RELEASE UK Region 2 with Disney Hologram

Tarzan (1999) Disney [VHS]

Tarzan (1999) Disney [VHS]
£14.99

After viewing Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Edgar Rice Burroughs wrote to Walt Disney about adapting his novel of an ape-man into a feature animated cartoon. Sixty odd years later, the tale is finally told with brilliant design work that looks unlike any previous animated film. The story is a natural for Disney since the themes of misunderstood central figures have been at the heart of most of its recent hits. Disney's Tarzan doesn't wander far from the familiar story of a shipwrecked baby who is brought up by apes in Africa. What gives the film its zing is its clever use of music (the songs are sung by Phil Collins himself rather than onscreen characters) and the remarkable animation. Deep Canvas, a 3-D technology, was developed for the film, creating a jungle that comes alive as Tarzan swings through the trees, often looking like a modern skateboarder racing down giant tree limbs. The usual foray of sidekicks, including a rambunctious ape voiced by Rosie O'Donnell, should keep the little ones aptly entertained. The two lead voices, Tony Goldwyn as Tarzan and Minnie Driver as Jane, are inspired choices. Their chemistry helps the story through the weakest points (the last third) and makes Tarzan's initial connection with all things human (including Jane) delicious entertainment. Disney still is not taking risks in its animated films, but as cookie-cutter entertainment, Tarzan makes a pretty good treat. On the DVD: It's the dish--mistakes, unused footage, creative differences, embarrassing behind-the-scene stories--that makes collector's editions so much fun. Unfortunately, this goes against the Disney philosophy of picture-perfection, and this two-set disc shows it; only half of the new material is engaging. The other half of this second disc, the "Tarzan Archives," is a slickly produced filler--more publicity fluff than real insight on the development of the film and the animation process. Much better are the three abandoned scenes (with voices and storyboards), including a much fiercer opening and ending, plus dozens of sketches made over the years as the designers pursued the luscious look of the film. The original audio demos Phil Collins made for the film are also intriguing (mostly filled with dummy or place-holding lyrics). The new audio commentary (by the producer and two directors) is a "fireside chat" variety, hardly worth more than one listen. Two side-by-side comparisons of storyboards to final film are a great tool to show youngsters how the animated process works, as is animator Glen Keane's talks on animating Tarzan. Also for kids: a read-along book and trivia game. --Doug Thomas

Tarzan Disney Ost

Tarzan Disney Ost
£8.71

If you've ever cringed in anticipation of the schmaltzy warbling in a Disney picture, then this could be the album to confound your expectations. The idea of Phil Collins is a great start anyway, with his huskily strained vocals bringing a very different sound. On top of that, the marriage of his songs and voice into Mark Mancina's rollicking score is done in a very successful way. Their goal was to integrate Collins as a singing narrator, the trick being to avoid a clash between score ending and song beginning. Pleasingly the album retains much of that seamlessness. You might feel you could do without reprising duets with luscious boy band 'N Sync, but thanks to the jungle rhythms of Speed king Mancina, they do actually feel like a part of the whole. "Two Worlds" is a definite highlight of the collaboration for musicality, but "Trashin' the Camp" has the inventive laughs. And yes, it does finish on the famous Tarzan yodel! --Paul Tonks

Tarzan (1999) Disney - Collector's Edition (2 Disc) [DVD]

Tarzan (1999) Disney - Collector's Edition (2 Disc) [DVD]
£8.49

After viewing Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Edgar Rice Burroughs wrote to Walt Disney about adapting his novel of an ape-man into a feature animated cartoon. Sixty odd years later, the tale is finally told with brilliant design work that looks unlike any previous animated film. The story is a natural for Disney since the themes of misunderstood central figures have been at the heart of most of its recent hits. Disney's Tarzan doesn't wander far from the familiar story of a shipwrecked baby who is brought up by apes in Africa. What gives the film its zing is its clever use of music (the songs are sung by Phil Collins himself rather than onscreen characters) and the remarkable animation. Deep Canvas, a 3-D technology, was developed for the film, creating a jungle that comes alive as Tarzan swings through the trees, often looking like a modern skateboarder racing down giant tree limbs. The usual foray of sidekicks, including a rambunctious ape voiced by Rosie O'Donnell, should keep the little ones aptly entertained. The two lead voices, Tony Goldwyn as Tarzan and Minnie Driver as Jane, are inspired choices. Their chemistry helps the story through the weakest points (the last third) and makes Tarzan's initial connection with all things human (including Jane) delicious entertainment. Disney still is not taking risks in its animated films, but as cookie-cutter entertainment, Tarzan makes a pretty good treat. On the DVD: It's the dish--mistakes, unused footage, creative differences, embarrassing behind-the-scene stories--that makes collector's editions so much fun. Unfortunately, this goes against the Disney philosophy of picture-perfection, and this two-set disc shows it; only half of the new material is engaging. The other half of this second disc, the "Tarzan Archives," is a slickly produced filler--more publicity fluff than real insight on the development of the film and the animation process. Much better are the three abandoned scenes (with voices and storyboards), including a much fiercer opening and ending, plus dozens of sketches made over the years as the designers pursued the luscious look of the film. The original audio demos Phil Collins made for the film are also intriguing (mostly filled with dummy or place-holding lyrics). The new audio commentary (by the producer and two directors) is a "fireside chat" variety, hardly worth more than one listen. Two side-by-side comparisons of storyboards to final film are a great tool to show youngsters how the animated process works, as is animator Glen Keane's talks on animating Tarzan. Also for kids: a read-along book and trivia game. --Doug Thomas

Tarzan: The Greystoke Legacy (Tarzan a Legend Reborn)

Tarzan: The Greystoke Legacy (Tarzan a Legend Reborn)
£6.99

What lies in the depths of the jungle? Escaping a dark secret, Robbie Canler joins an illegal logging team in the Congo jungle. Now they"re under siege from a sinister force. When the daughter of the camp's boss, Jane Porter, goes missing they assume bloodthirsty rebel soldiers have kidnapped her. Robbie sets out on a rescue mission - unaware he is being watched...Are the rumours of a feral man raised by wild apes true? If so, can the mysterious untamed savage be trusted to help them?

Tarzan / Tarzan 2 / Tarzan & Jane [DVD]

Tarzan / Tarzan 2 / Tarzan & Jane [DVD]
£6.63

Tarzan / Tarzan 2 / Tarzan & Jane [DVD]

Tarzan of the Apes (Adventures of Lord Greystoke) (The Adventures of Lord Greystoke)

Tarzan of the Apes (Adventures of Lord Greystoke) (The Adventures of Lord Greystoke)
£6.06

Paperback. Pub Date: 2011 Pages: 288 Publisher: Sterling After a mutiny on board their ship to itish noble couple Lord and Lady Greystoke are Marooned by The Crew on a desolate African Beach the WITH their Newborn son John Clayton Not long after. the founding boy is an orphan. his mother dead of natural causes and his father at the hands of a vicious ape. Saved by the she-ape Kala. who had just lost her own baby. John was raised in the jungle as one of Kala's own and named 'Tarzan (white skin). After learning the ways of the jungle and also schooling himself by reading books left behind by his parents. Tarzan does battle with the ape who killed his father and becomes king of the jungle. Later Tarzan falls in love with Jane Porter. a beautiful American woman who is part of an exploration party and is forced to make a choice between the world of man and the world of the jungle.

Tarzan of the Apes (Read Red)

Tarzan of the Apes (Read Red)
£5.99

Conquering the savage laws of the wilderness, Tarzan grows into a mighty warrior and becomes leader of his tribe of apes. When an expedition of white treasure hunters enters his jungle kingdom, accompanied by the beautiful Jane Porter, Tarzan's primitive heart is struck and he determines to become civilized in order to win her.

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